Independence: At What Cost?

A quote from THE MEMOIR OF COLONEL BENJAMIN TALLMADGE, in which he describes the result of our Declaration Of Independence

A quote from THE MEMOIR OF COLONEL BENJAMIN TALLMADGE, in which he describes the result of our Declaration Of Independence

 

To declare our independence meant that there was no going back. It would have been the easier thing, to fade back and live under the rule of King George. The safer thing.Watch Full Movie Online Streaming Online and Download

Instead, our founding fathers put themselves, their families and their countrymen into the line of fire. For this declaration meant that there was no going back. This contest could not be talked or negotiated to a conclusion. There would be blood spilled. And a lot of it would be American.

Benjamin Tallmadge is one of my heroes, largely still unsung. He is the subject of my book BY THE SWORD, titled from his quote. Benjamin, like most soldiers, was dedicated by untrained. Not a soldier by trade, but a teacher. He was part of Washington’s army at The Battle of Long Island, our first battle after declaring our independence. A battle in which we paid the price for our declaration and our desires – and we almost lost the war.

Today, I urge you to think about what it was like for the men who kew they faced death by this declaration. And think of Washington, ready to back up signatures with swords. Think of the people who gave their lives so we could be free. What do we do with our freedoms? Was it worth the price they paid?

What would you do, in their shoes?

 

 

John Adams I-am-well-aware-of-the

 

Benjamin Franklin It-is-a-commonThomas Jefferson Equal-and-exact-justice

 

This is my book BY THE SWORD, titled from Benjamin Tallmadge's quote. Essentially,  it describes the reality of what declaring independence meant.

This is my book BY THE SWORD, titled from Benjamin Tallmadge’s quote. Essentially, it describes the reality of what declaring independence meant. I’ll be sharing a post about The Battle of Long Island in the near future (the anniversary is in August.) It is perhaps our most under-celebrated and under-appreciated moment in American history.

 

Comment (1)

  1. Sirirat

    It’s funny how things evvole. When you say December 25th or February 14th or even March 17th, people know what holiday you are talking about.4th of July as a phrase comes from the song Yankee Doodle Dandy a real live nephew of my Uncle Sam, born on the 4th of July! so maybe that’s how it got into circulation.

    Reply

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